Find An Inductee:
Share |
abraham
Byron Abraham
Inducted in 2010

Byron Abraham

Athlete

After a career where he would set numerous high school records in football, baseball and track, including holding the Section III record in 1982 for most rushing yards in a season and in a career and also the Section III record in the 100m and 200m in track, Byron Abraham was the most heavily recruited high school football athlete in the entire Utica area in 1983. 

When the University of Notre Dame called, the Notre Dame High School star committed, and played in all of the Fighting Irish’s games as a True Freshman.  In his first game, Abraham scored a touchdown against Purdue University.  In the Liberty Bowl that year against No. 10 Boston College, Abraham helped secure a nail-biting win for the Irish 19-18.

After transferring to Syracuse University in 1984, Abraham would become one of the Orangemen’s leading offensive stars.  That year, he was the team’s second leading rusher behind College Football Hall of Famer Don McPherson, and the team would play in the Cherry Bowl.

In 1987, Abraham, then a senior, helped the Orangemen to an historic undefeated season and a Sugar Bowl berth.  His touchdown in the team’s game against the University of West Virginia secured a 31-30 Syracuse win and preserved their undefeated season.  That year, Syracuse would finish the College Football season ranked No. 4 nationally.

Abraham’s accolades have been numerous.  Some of the most noted awards and honors he has received include the 1983 All-Upstate High School Player of the Year, being named as one of the Top 100 incoming Freshmen in the Nation by The Sporting News magazine, a 1983 Adidas High School All-American in Football, the 1984 National Collegiate Baseball League Leading Hitter (he batted .400 that season), CBS Co-Player of the Game in 1985 against the University of Pittsburgh, a Coca-Cola Player of the Game in 1987 against the University of West Virginia, and a 2003 selection for the Notre Dame High School Brother More Sports Hall of Fame.